Tag Archives: Midwest

Siouxland Ozymandias

8 May

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

Oddly enough, the empire began by way of a very sore bum. An Englishman named William Brooks Close, who, with his brothers, was in Philadelphia for a rowing match in 1876, so banged up his posterior in practice, that he could not sit without pillows. While the rest of the crew continued to work out, but he had to sit out.

So my friend Jim Schaap begins his latest regional story at KWIT–this time, about the Close brothers of England who purchased large quantities of Siouxland acres in the 1870s and 1880s. You may read his entire story here.

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The Woodbury County Iowa Courthouse 100th Anniversary Virtual Tour

7 May

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

The Woodbury County Courthouse, Sioux City, Iowa is 100 years old, and it is a magnificent example of Prairie Style architecture. Take a look at this virtual tour and see for yourself.

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On Willa Cather, by Jane Smiley

5 May

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

Jane Smiley is, of course, a novelist who is place-conscious. Her introduction to Willa Cather, another place-conscious writer, is at The Paris Review; you may read it here.

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Faithland: What’s the Most Highly Religious Part of America?

13 Feb

Faithland map of religious adherence in America

via Faithland: What’s the Most Highly Religious Part of America?

Brothers in Arms

6 Dec

Read about the Eyde brothers of Illinois and their letters to one another during World War II. The letters have only recently been re-discovered. Dan Lamothe provides a concise overview at the Washington Post here.

Siouxland and the Sioux

9 Oct

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

“So what’s the story of the Sioux?” she asks me. The question comes whistling out of the blue, or so it seems, and catches me off guard. “What do you mean?” I say. “I mean, I see the name all over the place—Sioux Falls, Sioux Center, Sioux City, Sioux County…so where are they? I don’t see many …

Read more of Brian Keepers’ post, and my comments on it, here at The Twelve: The Question She Asked Me – THE TWELVE

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A Walk in Willa Cather’s Prairie

26 Sep

Alex Ross provides a wonderful report-essay in the New Yorker on Willa Cather and the new National Willa Cather Center: A Walk in Willa Cather’s Prairie | The New Yorker

Exploring the Past

Reading, Thinking, and Blogging about History

Enough Light

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Discoveries from processing and reference archivists on the job

john pavlovitz

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Wirelesshogan: Reflections from the Hogan

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

The Way of Improvement Leads Home

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

the way of improvement leads home

reflections at the intersection of American history, religion, politics, and academic life

The Pietist Schoolman

The website and blog of historian Chris Gehrz

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American Indian News

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Your guide to practically true history.

THE TWELVE

Reformed. Done Daily.

i-history

by Alex Scarfe

blogwestdotorg.wordpress.com/

Thoughtful Conversation about the American West

Northwest History

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

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