Tag Archives: museums

This Replica of a Tlingit Killer Whale Hat Is Spurring Dialogue About Digitization

11 Sep

Collaboration between museums and indigenous groups provides educational opportunities, archival documentation—and ethical dilemmas. Read Meilan Solly’s report here at the Smithsonian: This Replica of a Tlingit Killer Whale Hat Is Spurring Dialogue About Digitization | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian

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A Noose at the Smithsonian Brings History Back to Life

23 Jun

Pequot Museum Unveils Largest Collection of 17th Century Battlefield Artifacts on Display in New England

30 Sep

New Pequot War Exhibit Showcases more than 50 Recently-Recovered Objects from Mistick Fort Battlefield at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Re…

Source: Pequot Museum Unveils Largest Collection of 17th Century Battlefield Artifacts on Display in New England – Native News Online

The Definitive Story of How the National Museum of African American History and Culture Came to Be

14 Sep

From courting Chuck Berry in Missouri to diving for a lost slave ship off Africa, the director’s tale is a fascinating one: The Definitive Story of How the National Museum of African American History and Culture Came to Be | At the Smithsonian | Smithsonian

D.C.’s new African American museum is a bold challenge to traditional Washington architecture

14 Sep

My wife and I could only see this exterior view when we visited DC two weeks ago. We shall have to visit again so that we can see the interior. Christopher Hawthorne here in the LA Times offers a fine review of the architecture of the new National Museum of African American History and Culture: D.C.’s new African American museum is a bold challenge to traditional Washington architecture – LA Times

The ‘new’ Nixon library’s challenge: Fairly depicting a ‘failed presidency’

16 Aug

Christine Mai-Due of the Los Angeles Times provides a fascinating look at the redo of the Nixon Library: The ‘new’ Nixon library’s challenge: Fairly depicting a ‘failed presidency’ – LA Times

Falling in love: Courtship in a Japanese American internment camp

23 Mar

Cedric S. Yeh of the National Museum of American History writes:

During the opening months of World War II, almost 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of them citizens of the United States, were forced out of their homes and into detention camps established by the U.S. government. Many would spend the next three years living under armed guard, behind barbed wire. Life did continue behind the barbed wire. Though residents had been deprived of their most basic rights, Japanese Americans lived as normally as possible. Internees produced a wide variety of arts and crafts objects from natural materials found in and near the camps. Today’s blog post by Deputy Chair and Associate Curator in the Division of Armed Forces History Cedric Yeh explores the story behind some of these small, handmade objects.

Read the rest of his post here: Falling in love: Courtship in a Japanese American internment camp | National Museum of American History

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