Tag Archives: historiography

Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online

11 Oct

The Library of Congress has put the papers of Ulysses S. Grant online for the first time in their original format at https://www.loc.gov/collections/ulysses-s-grant-papers/about-this-collection/.The Library holds a treasure trove of documents from the Civil War commander and 18th president of the United States, including personal correspondence, “headquarters records” created during the Civil War and the original handwritten manuscript of Grant’s memoir— regarded as one of the best in history—among other items. The collection totals approximately 50,000 items dating from 1819-1974, with the bulk falling in the period 1843-1885.The collection includes general and family correspondence, speeches, reports, messages, military records, financial and legal records, newspaper clippings, scrapbooks, memorabilia and other papers. The collection relates to Grant’s service in the Mexican War and Civil War, his pre-Civil War career, and …

Source: Papers of Ulysses S. Grant Now Online | Library of Congress

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Ken Burns, America’s best-known documentarian, explained

28 Sep

His aim is not to make us rethink American history, but, rather, to reexperience it.

So says Todd VanDerWerff in his post at Vox. Read his astute essay on Burns here: Ken Burns, America’s best-known documentarian, explained – Vox

PBS The Vietnam War: “Riding the Tiger” (1961-1963)

19 Sep

Read historian Christian G. Appy’s thoughtful review of episode #2 of Burns & Novick’s The Vietnam War documentary: “Riding the Tiger” (1961-1963)

There Never Was a Real Tulip Fever

18 Sep

A new movie sets its doomed entrepreneurs amidst 17th-century “tulipmania”—but historians of the phenomenon have their own bubble to burst. Read Lorraine Boissoneault’s report at the Smithsonian on historian Anne Goldgar’s work on tulipmania here: There Never Was a Real Tulip Fever | History | Smithsonian

PBS’ The Vietnam War: “Déjà Vu” (1858-1961)

18 Sep

Read historian Christian G. Appy’s thoughtful review of episode 1 of Burns & Novick’s The Vietnam War documentary here at the Organization of American Historian’s site: “Déjà Vu” (1858-1961)

The Vietnam War, a documentary

14 Sep

This weekend, at last, The Vietnam War will land on our rooftops, ready to transport us back a half century and more to a conflict “begun in good faith, by decent people, out of fateful misunderstandings” that led to “a decade of agony—the most divisive period since the Civil War.” It was a “tragedy …

Read here, at the Organization of American Historians, the rest of historian Christian G. Appy’s inaugural post on Ken Burn’s new documentary series: The Vietnam War, a documentary

Witnessing a Rally for a Brand-New Confederate Monument

30 Aug

Alexis Okeowo, a black woman, reflects at the New Yorker on her attending the rally for a new Confederate monument: Witnessing a Rally for a Brand-New Confederate Monument | The New Yorker

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