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Mortar Found at “Jesus’ Tomb” Dates to the Constantine Era Read

29 Nov

edicule

In the year 325 A.D., according to historical sources, Constantine, Rome’s first Christian emperor, sent an envoy to Jerusalem in the hopes of locating the tomb of Jesus of Nazareth. His representatives were reportedly told that Jesus’ burial place lay under a pagan temple to Venus, which they proceeded to tear down. Beneath the building, they discovered a tomb cut from a limestone cave. Constantine subsequently ordered a majestic church—now known as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre—to be built at the site.

So begins Brigit Katz’s brief report at Smithsonian.com about recent archaeological work at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, Jerusalem. You can read the entire post, with links, here.

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Behold the Newly Digitized 400-Year-Old Codex Quetzalecatz

28 Nov

The Codex Quetzalecatzin

One of the most important surviving Mesoamerican manuscripts from the 16th century has just become available to the general public.

So begins Julissa Trevino’s post at Smithsonian.com. You can read the entire post, with links, here.

Shootout at the OK Corral – Oct 26, 1881

26 Oct

The Tombstone Epitaph, founded by J.P. Clum, covered the OK Corral shootout.

Shootout at the OK Corral on Oct 26, 1881. Wyatt Earp and his brothers were Dutch Americans and, at one time, residents of Pella, Iowa. Another Dutch American was John P. Clum, who in 1881 was the Mayor of Tombstone. While the Earps were not religiously affiliated, Clum was. He was raised in his native New York in the Reformed Church in America. Once in the West, since he could find no Reformed congregations, he became Presbyterian. He and Wyatt Earp kept in touch afterward even as they went their separate ways.

Learn more about what happened at the OK Corral here: Shootout at the OK Corral – Oct 26, 1881 – HISTORY.com.

Learn more about John P. Clum in my article on him, of which you can find a pdf here.

The Religious Roots of America’s Love for Camping

17 Oct

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

Summer 1868 passed as an unremarkable season at Saranac Lake in New York’s Adirondack Mountains. The weather was fine, the scenery delightful, and the usual array of 200 to 300 recreational hunters and anglers passed through the small settlement on their way into the wild lands beyond. The summers of 1869 and 1870, however, were an altogether different story. The weather was more or less the same, and the scenery continued to entrance, but instead of a handful of sportsmen came a multitude of men and women from points east and south to enjoy America’s newest recreation—camping. Almost to a person, they had been inspired by what today, at the beginning of the 21st century, we recognize as the watershed book in the history of American camping: the first comprehensive “how-to-camp” guidebook, Adventures in the Wilderness; or, Camp-Life in the Adirondacks, which had been written in April 1869 by…

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Siouxland and the Sioux

9 Oct

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

“So what’s the story of the Sioux?” she asks me. The question comes whistling out of the blue, or so it seems, and catches me off guard. “What do you mean?” I say. “I mean, I see the name all over the place—Sioux Falls, Sioux Center, Sioux City, Sioux County…so where are they? I don’t see many …

Read more of Brian Keepers’ post, and my comments on it, here at The Twelve: The Question She Asked Me – THE TWELVE

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A Walk in Willa Cather’s Prairie

26 Sep

Alex Ross provides a wonderful report-essay in the New Yorker on Willa Cather and the new National Willa Cather Center: A Walk in Willa Cather’s Prairie | The New Yorker

Tribes Defy Storm & Bureaucracy to Deliver Name Change Declaration to Yellowstone

19 Sep

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK – “I stand in strong solidarity with you and my indigenous brothers and sisters in your demands to change the names in Yellowstone from war criminals to humane and freedom-loving people!” Dr. Cornel West informed Chief Stan Grier, a message sent for tribal leaders on the eve of their unity protest in Yellowstone. That Harvard professor Dr. West, once described by President Obama as “a genius, a public intellectual, a preacher, an oracle” and “the most exciting black American scholar ever” by critics, has publicly supported Tribal Nations’ efforts to change the names of proponents and exponents of indigenous genocide in Yellowstone, suggests the traction and profile the issue is gaining.

Read the rest of the story here at Native News Online: Backed by Civil Rights “Genius” Dr. Cornel West, Tribes Defy Storm, Bureaucracy & Deliver Name Change Declaration to Yellowstone – Native News Online

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Wirelesshogan: Reflections from the Hogan

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