Tag Archives: archives

Actually, Yes, It *Is* a Discovery If You Find Something in an Archive That No One Knew Was There

23 Jun

The researcher responsible for digging a report of Lincoln out of an archive responds to a recent Atlantic essay about her find.

Source: Actually, Yes, It *Is* a Discovery If You Find Something in an Archive That No One Knew Was There – The Atlantic

Where Historians Work: Q&A with Margaret Bendroth of the Congregational Library and Archives

23 Jun

It’s not enough to have an archive full of great stuff—“Library 2.0” as I’ve come to understand it, means making your material accessible and compelling to all kinds of different people. How do you convince the average person on the street that the past matters? Not in some golly-gee whiz isn’t this neat kind of way, but in clear and simple language.

At the Junto, Katy Lasdow interviews Margaret Bendroth, the Executive Director of the Congregational Library & Archives. (I just finished reading Bendroth’s The Last Puritans. It is well worth your time to read.)

Source: Where Historians Work: Q&A with Margaret Bendroth of the Congregational Library and Archives « The Junto

Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps Now Online

25 May

The Library of Congress has placed online nearly 25,000 Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps, which depict the structure and use of buildings in U.S. cities and towns. Maps will be added monthly until 2020, for a total of approximately 500,000.The online collection now features maps published prior to 1900.  The states available include Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Alaska is also online, with maps published through the early 1960s.  By 2020, all the states will be online, showing maps from the late 1880s through the early 1960s.

Source: Sanborn Fire Insurance Maps Now Online | Library of Congress

How to Digitize a 357-Year-Old Atlas That’s Nearly 6 Feet Tall

10 May

What does one do when the scanner is too small? Read about what the British Library did: How to Digitize a 357-Year-Old Atlas That’s Nearly 6 Feet Tall – Atlas Obscura

Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942-1946

8 May

Heart Mountain Relocation Center, Powell, WY

The Library of Congress announces its digitization of Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers: About this Collection – Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942-1946 | Digital Collections | Library of Congress

Every Historian Her Own Adventurer, or, don’t forget the archivist

1 May

This spring, early Americanists were abuzz about “a bit of real-life archival drama,” as Harvard scholars Danielle Allen and Emily Sneff announced that they had discovered a parchment copy of the Declaration of Independence in a British archives.

Did the historians discover it? Or, since an archivist had listed as among the papers of a British leader, and the list of contents of the papers was online, was it really a discovery?

Read Tom Cutterham’s reflections on this here at The Junto: Every Historian Her Own Adventurer « The Junto

London library makes denying the Holocaust a little harder

26 Apr

The Wiener Library for the Study of Holocaust & Genocide is making the United Nations’ files on World War II war crimes more accessible by allowing the general public to search an online catalog of the documents for the first time beginning Friday.

People will still have to visit the library in London or the US Holocaust Museum to read the actual files.The move is expected to increase interest in the archives of the United Nations War Crimes Commission, including the names of some 37,000 people identified as war criminals and security suspects. The commission operated in 1943-1949, but access to its records was restricted for political reasons in the early days of the Cold War.

Read the rest of Danica Kirka’s story on this at the Christian Science Monitor: London library makes denying the Holocaust a little harder – CSMonitor.com

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