Tag Archives: photography

How Photographers Captured the Incarceration of Japanese Americans During WWII

31 Jan

San Francisco, California, April 25, 1942.

Photographer Toyo Miyatake was 14 when he arrived in America in 1909, and 46 when he was forcibly moved from his home in Los Angeles to the Manzanar incarceration camp. By then, he was a father of four and owner of a photo studio. As he and his family gathered their belongings—whatever they could carry—he grabbed a few items that were considered contraband: a lens, a shutter, and film holders.

So begins Anika Burgess’s account of an exhibition of photographs of the relocation and control of Japanese Americans during World War II. You may read the rest of the post, with selected photographs, here.

 

 

Advertisements

Meet Buster, the rooster who can skate

20 Oct

A rooster named Buster roller skates and ice skates. See the 1952 photos and hear the story by the then-photographer of the LA Times: From the Archives: Meet Buster, the rooster who can skate – LA Times

In 100 years, will today’s digital files be accessible? Planning for ‘digital obsolescence’

19 Aug

Are you planning ahead for accessing what has been digitized? Here’s some material to help you think about this: In 100 years, will today’s digital files be accessible? Planning for ‘digital obsolescence’ | St. Louis Public Radio

Oldest Surviving Photograph of a U.S. President Has Surfaced

19 Aug

The 1843 daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams was discovered by a descendant of Vermont Representative Horace Everett. It is the oldest surviving photograph of a U.S. President, as noted here at the Smithsonian: Oldest Surviving Photograph of a U.S. President Has Surfaced | Smart News | Smithsonian

1917 draft board, Los Angeles–100 years ago.

18 Aug

 

One hundred years ago, World War I was still raging. The Los Angeles Times has a photo here from then: 1917 draft board – Framework – Photos and Video – Visual Storytelling from the Los Angeles Times

Solomon D. Butcher’s Photographs Celebrate the Pioneer

6 Aug

Carson Vaughan at the Paris Review has a fascinating piece on Nebraska photographer Solomon D. Butcher. Read it here, and see some of Butcher’s photographs: The Paris Review – Blog Archive Solomon D. Butcher’s Photographs Celebrate the Pioneer

The Rare-Book Thief Who Looted College Libraries in the ’80s

24 Jul

By passing as a professor, James Richard Shinn made off with over $100,000 worth of books. Read Susan Falciani’s fascinating account of the master book thief here: The Rare-Book Thief Who Looted College Libraries in the ’80s – Atlas Obscura

Enough Light

"In faith there is enough light for those who want to believe and enough shadows to blind those who don't." - Blaise Pascal

Lenten Lamentations

Preparing to Participate in God's Mosaic Kingdom

john pavlovitz

Stuff That Needs To Be Said

Wirelesshogan: Reflections from the Hogan

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

The Way of Improvement Leads Home

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

the way of improvement leads home

reflections at the intersection of American history, religion, politics, and academic life

The Pietist Schoolman

The website and blog of historian Chris Gehrz

Native News Online

American Indian News

thepracticalhistorian

Your guide to practically true history.

THE TWELVE

Reformed. Done Daily.

i-history

by Alex Scarfe

blogwestdotorg.wordpress.com/

Thoughtful Conversation about the American West

Northwest History

"History is the record of our loves in all their magnificent and ignoble forms." Eugene McCarraher

Faith and History

Thinking Christianly about the American Past

%d bloggers like this: