What Poop Can Teach Us About an Ancient City’s Downfall

27 Feb

Northwest Iowa Center for Regional Studies

An aerial shot of Cahokia's Monks Mound.

NEVER UNDERESTIMATE THE POWER OF poop. After more than 1,000 years, it can still have a lot to offer.

Just ask the authors of a new study, out today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, which discusses how fecal remains can teach us about the rise and fall of Cahokia, an ancient city less than 10 miles outside of present-day St. Louis, Missouri. According to UNESCO, Cahokia was “the largest pre-Columbian settlement north of Mexico.”

So begins Matthew Taub’s Atlas Obscura post on Cahokia. You may read the entire post here.

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2 Responses to “What Poop Can Teach Us About an Ancient City’s Downfall”

  1. rkoerselman February 27, 2019 at 10:48 am #

    ha! love it!
    RK
    ________________________________

  2. Michael & Carolyn Yoder February 27, 2019 at 5:02 pm #

    Sounds scatalogical to me! 🙂 PS Carolyn grew up within 40 miles or so from Cahokia.

    Mike

    >

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