Edward Curtis & Return to the Land of the Head Hunters

26 Feb

Photographer Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952) is primarily known for his 20-volume photographic work The North American Indian, a document published between 1907-1930 that captured images of what he called the “Disappearing Race.” The North American Indian defined—and, lamentably, continues to define—the image of Turtle Island’s Indigenous people in the age of photography. Curtis’ other major work was a feature-length silent film, In The Land of The Head Hunters, which he created with the team who assisted him in collecting his songs and images. Curtis had hoped Head Hunters would save him from financial ruin. But the film, which had reportedly cost $20,000 to make, only grossed $3,269 when it premiered in 1914.

So begins a post by Christina Rose at Indian Country Today. Curtis has been noted on this site by me before. For better and for worse, he is significant for the history and understanding of Native Americans.

Now, most of Curtis’ movie has been restored. You can read about it all here in Rose’s full post: Return to the Land of the Head Hunters: 100 Years Later, Edward Curtis’ Movie Plays Again – ICTMN.com.

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